Soccer Coaching Blog | Professional Soccer Coaching Advice


Why coaches are so important

davidscwnewOne of the positives to have come out of the opening of St George’s Park in England last year is the recognition being given to the thousands of coaches up and down the country that make grassroots football tick.

St Georges will hopefully be putting coaches at the forefront of football in England, much like the situation is in Europe and America. Without coaches there wouldn’t be matches taking place every weekend.

The hours you coaches spend getting the right advice and the right sessions not only helps to create a development culture at your club but is also vitally important to the children you coach. I know how hard it is for all of you because I’ve started clubs too, and have stood in front of parents wondering how on earth I was going to fulfil their wishes.

Like you, I’ve stood at the end of a game when my team has lost, wondering if we would ever win again. Yes, it can be hard sometimes but coaching is also a wonderful experience, with some amazing highs. I spoke to a coach this week who has set up his own team because the side his son played for no longer saw the boy as part of their future.

His son sat on the bench most matches and when he was allowed on, he was screamed at and told what to do. That’s not being a coach – coaches make football fun. To rescue his son he created a team and set about learning what he should be coaching and how to manage.

He hadn’t realised all the things he would have to do: the amount of emails to players, the collection of subs, the payment of referees, coping with training, getting a kit and buying the right equipment. But I went to one of his matches and it was great to see him doing everything the right way, encouraging his players and making sure they all got a game. And at the end, when his team had won, he was bubbling over with delight. By doing it all himself he is learning the hard way that coaching is a huge responsibility.

Here at Soccer Coach Weekly we want to recognise all the hard work that goes into the role of the coach by shining a light on some of you who do the job. Which is why I run a Coach Of The Month feature, recognising grassroots coaches with all kinds of experience, whether it be for putting so much into the game every week or maybe just for making the kids happy.

If you want to nominate someone, or even yourself, to be Coach Of The Month, please tell us why and you could be featured in the magazine. Email your nominations to editor@soccercoachweekly.net



Lots of talk about concussion in football …

This is the advice i ran in Soccer Coach Weekly – click on the link below

Click this link: ConcussionAdvice_Part_1



Create goals from midfield session

davidscwnewIf you want your players to create goalscoring chances, try this exciting and fast-moving game and you’ll soon see the benefits.

WHY USE IT

This is a session aimed at getting players to create and utilise space in midfield. With quick passing and movement, it will help open up the opposition and make goalscoring chances.

SET UP

Create a playing area 40×20 yards, with two goals back to back across the middle, but just one goalkeeper. We’re using eight players and a keeper for this session, plus a server who can be the coach. You need bibs, cones, balls and two small goals.

HOW TO PLAY

Start by serving a ball into the game. Players can score in either of the two back-to-back goals. If the keeper gains possession or the ball leaves the area, serve a new ball in. The keeper puts any balls he gathers into the net behind him. When a goal is scored, immediately serve another ball into the game.

TECHNIQUE

Creating space in a match situation with fast and accurate passing will open up the room for midfielders to exploit. In this game, a quick switch of play allows players to take advantage of one of the goals being unguarded – they must be aware of the position of the keeper at all times.




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