Soccer Coaching Blog | Professional Soccer Coaching Advice


Attack and defend in quick, simple overloads

When playing matches the elements are constantly changing.

You can be attacking on your own one second, then have a team mate aor team mates in support to pass to pass to the next.

In your sessions it is a good idea to run exercises that are constantly changing so your players can prepare for this happening in matches. You can sometimes see players switching off when you do repetitive drills that have them doing A, B or C and they don’t have to think about it.

This exercise is a high intensity, near continuous game using five players. You can set up two or three of these depending on numbers at your training session.

How to set it up

Set up a few 15 x 30 yard pitches marking out with cones a couple of small goals at each end. You will need one pitch for every five players.

How to play it

  • Choose 3 players who will be given the ball first against the remaining two. Decide which end the 3 are to attack. The attacking team start with the ball bringing it out from the goal line. They can choose to pass or dribble, but no direct goals are allowed on the first touch. The emphasis is on restarting quickly.
  • The 3 play against the 2 until either: the two defenders win clear possession of the ball; they must have it under control; or the ball goes over the goal line last touched by an attacker.
  • If either of these two things happen, the two players who were defenders become attackers trying to score at the opposite end in a game of 2v1 against whichever attacker last touched the ball, the player who lost possession or took a shot.
  • The attackers retain possession on all balls that go out over the side lines.
  • You will need a coach or knowledgeable soccer parent to act as referee…the point is to designate immediately which player stays on and which players go off (ignore the “it wasn’t me” shouts). The attackers who go off should quickly step well out of the way of this new 2v1 game and sit out until it is finished.
  • The 2v1 game continues until it resolves in the same fashion as for the 3v2 game; the lone defender wins clear possession or the ball goes out off one of the two attackers.
  • Now the 3 players who just played 2v1 immediately join together in a team of 3 attackers against the 2 who had to stand out, with the 3 now attacking, so we are back to step one.


We lost 2-1 but it created a great session

David Clarke

2v1/3v2 transition game

OK, I’m going to say it – my team absolutely pummelled their opponents at the weekend and, yes, you guessed it, we lost 2-1. The number of times my players had an overload in their favour in front of goal was unbelievable and yet they didn’t exploit a single chance.

So what will we be working on this week? This session which exploits 2v1s and 3v2s in front of goal.

How it works

The advantage switches as the attack changes direction after every phase of play.

How to set it up

Use a 40 yards by 30 yards area with a goal and a goalkeeper at each end.

How to play it

  • The central player dribbles on to the pitch and passes to one of the two opponents.

  • Immediately, a 2v1 situation begins.

  • Once this ball is played, two team mates join the defender and a 3v2 game commences in the opposite direction.

Rotate your players

  • Rotate the players’ positions so both teams have a chance to attack 2v1 and 3v2.




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