Soccer Coaching Blog | Professional Soccer Coaching Advice


Why grassroots coaches matter

davidscwnewOne of the positives to have come out of the opening of St George’s Park in England is the recognition being given to the thousands of coaches up and down the country that make grassroots football tick. St Georges will hopefully be putting coaches at the forefront of football in England, much like the situation is in Europe and America.

Without coaches there wouldn’t be matches taking place every weekend. The hours you coaches spend getting the right advice and the right sessions not only helps to create a development culture at your club but is also vitally important to the children you coach.

I know how hard it is for all of you because I’ve started clubs too, and have stood in front of parents wondering how on earth I was going to fulfil their wishes. Like you, I’ve stood at the end of a game when my team has lost, wondering if we would ever win again. Yes, it can be hard sometimes, but coaching is also a wonderful experience, with some amazing highs.

I spoke to a coach this week who has set up his own team because the side his son played for no longer saw the boy as part of their future. His son sat on the bench most matches and when he was allowed on, he was screamed at and told what to do. That’s not being a coach – coaches make football fun.

To rescue his son he created a team and set about learning what he should be coaching and how to manage. He hadn’t realised all the things he would have to do: the amount of emails to players, the collection of subs, the payment of referees, coping with training, getting a kit and buying the right equipment.

But I went to one of his matches and it was great to see him doing everything the right way, encouraging his players and making sure they all got a game. And at the end, when his team had won, he was bubbling over with delight. By doing it all himself he is learning the hard way that coaching is a huge responsibility.

As Head Coach of Soccer Coach Weekly I want to recognise all the hard work that goes into the role of the coach by shining a light on some of you who do the job. In our Coach Of The Month feature, the magazine recognises grassroots coaches with all kinds of experience, whether it be for putting so much into the game every week or maybe just for making the kids happy.

If you want to nominate someone, or even yourself, to be Coach Of The Month, please tell us why and you could be featured in the magazine. Email your nominations to editor@soccercoachweekly.net



Why coaches need equipment

davidscwnewWe had a debate in Soccer Coach Weekly last year (issue 284) that asked whether the cost of boots and kit is turning players away from the game - 67% said it was, so I’m not taking costs lightly. And I know it can be even worse for those of you who have to buy stuff just so that your players can train.

A coach’s kit includes all the playing basics, but might also include cones, bibs, balls, target goals, and more. They’re not the cheapest of things, but largely essential.

In my early days of coaching I went through a season where I thought I could cope without costly equipment. How wrong I was. The environment for coaching was bad and the players picked up on this. I was limited to using the same selection of drills and playing similar games on the same sized pitch each week because we only had a few balls.

Success as a coach depends not only on what you do but also on what you don’t do. An important part of that success is the environment in which you coach your players. It needs to be safe and sound to make the players feel secure but it also needs to give them decisions to make, must be fun, and most certainly needs to develop their playing skills.

I spoke to a coach this week who, like myself all those years ago, was trying to get by without budgeting for cones, balls or bibs. He’d got into the bad habit of splitting his players into two teams depending on what colour shirt they were wearing, and playing a game for the majority of the training session.

There was nothing in the environment to help him coach – he could have been down the local park for all the good it was doing his team. Of course, there will be times when you’re thrown into an environment when you don’t have the right equipment for some reason – maybe there’s no key to the sports shed, or you’ve rushed home from work and forgotten your bags. I have strategies for those days that help you continue, but that’s a lesson for another day.

As for the coach I was speaking to, he’s going to rethink the way he approaches coaching and, on my advice, will invest in some cones and bibs as a first step. If you’re serious about your coaching then you have to be equipped, and very often parents will chip in because, after all, it’s for the good of their own kids.

Also look around for any deals through local associations that could save you money or bulk buying with another team.

I guess the message to take away from all this is ‘you’re not alone’!




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