Soccer Coaching Blog | Professional Soccer Coaching Advice


Missing an easy chance isn’t always a bad thing

davidscwnewSometimes you stand and look on aghast as one of your players misses a simple chance in front of goal – and it happened to one of my players at the weekend. Of course you cannot legislate for a player using his right foot and pushing the ball past the post when he should have just used his left. I’ve seen it happen many times in youth soccer and often it can stick with the player for the whole game.

Even though I have drummed it into my team that we don’t blame each other for mistakes it is the easy misses that leave players feeling glum. And you know as well as I do that a depressed player is going to be no good on the pitch.

I always try to give my players examples of professional players who make similar mistakes, yet who recover quickly.

Watching the Capital One Cup game last season between Leeds United and Southampton, I saw a fantastic example of this. Early in the first half, and with the game at 0-0, Leeds’ El Hadji Diouf beat defenders and goalkeeper with a ball across the six-yard box.

The ball came to the back post where Luke Varney was unmarked with a simple tap in. But everyone was left stunned when Varney somehow turned the ball back across the face of the open goal and wide from just a yard out. Look it up on YouTube!

However, Varney didn’t retreat into his shell. Instead, he took responsibility for the miss, dusted himself down, and subsequently ran the game, including setting up a goal. It was a fantastic comeback and a Man of the Match performance on many fronts.

His manager Neil Warnock praised what was a massive contribution in the end. He said: ‘I thought Luke epitomised our performance. He came up with the miss of the century yet was still Man of the Match for me. He wasn’t feeling well and was sick at half-time. I asked him for another 15 minutes and he gave me 40. That’s his attitude through and through.’

And that is the attitude we all need to try to get from our youth players. If you make them afraid of making mistakes you won’t get that Man of the Match performance out of them you so badly desire, because getting the best out of your players means they must be able to find a way past their mistakes, and quickly.

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