Soccer Coaching Blog | Professional Soccer Coaching Advice


Building from the back

davidscwnew

This practice looks at attacking movement that begins with every team’s last man – the keeper.

Starting these forward moves from the back takes courage and confidence but utilising possession in this way is good for technique and means opponents are being asked to work hard to get near the ball.

It rehearses passing into and creating space, forward movement, counter-attacking and support play. And with practice, players can really enjoy the benefits of such skilled and attractive build-up patterns.

How to set it up:

  • Use a 40×30 yards area with three small goals – each two yards wide – at each end.

  • You’ll need balls, bibs and cones (or poles).

  • The pictures above use 12 players (6v6) but you can adjust player numbers to suit.

  • Each team has three outfield players and a keeper in their defensive half, with two attackers in the opposition half.

Getting started:

  • The ball starts with one of the keepers. He has to patrol three gates at once and, given that the majority of his work is performed with his feet, he cannot use his hands.

  • The keeper passes the ball to a team mate in his own half.

  • This attacking team must make three passes – something they should be able to do quite easily with their 4v2 overload.

  • Once they complete the three passes, a player can pass or dribble into the opposition half of the pitch, supported by his team mates, which creates a 5v4 overload.

  • To score, attackers must dribble the ball through any of the three opposition gates.

  • If the defending team wins the ball back, it can counter attack – there are no offsides. If it cannot counter, passing back to the keeper resets play – opposition players return to their original positions, and the exercise restarts by building from the back.

Why this works:

This session works because it helps coach breaking into space when attacking, and covering space when defending.

Players are encouraged to create overloads by exploring space, and having three goals to aim at offers the chance to combine width with intelligent running.

The threat of the opposition in counter attacking reminds attackers that while considered build-up play is encouraged, they must stay aware of their defensive positions as well.

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