Soccer Coaching Blog | Professional Soccer Coaching Advice


Teach your players which foot to play off depending on how much time they have on the ball

BACK FOOT the ball is played to the foot furthest from the defender

FRONT FOOT the ball is played to the foot nearest the passer

 

Ball Control and Footwork

Front foot, back foot from David Clarke's Soccer Tactics Made SimpleThe foot furthest away from the ball is known as the back foot.When receiving the ball, with time and space to turn, a player should open his body andreceive the ball on his back foot to dribble forward.

Front foot refers to the foot nearest the ball.

When receiving the ball under pressure from an opponent and unable to turn, a player must receive the ball on his front foot and protect the ball by placing his body between the ball and the opponent. Now the player can choose to pass to a team mate or turn away from the opponent using a quick skill or trick=.

David Clarke’s Soccer Tactics Made Simple explains 58 of the game’s tactical concepts in simple, plain language. Read more.

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Practise the Volley Pass

Your players need to have skills to beat their opponents and give your team the advantage on match days and a volley pass is a fast pass when team mates are in space for a long pass to catch out their opponents. Here’s how to do it…

WHY USE IT

A volley pass gives players power and accuracy over longer distances.

SET-UP

You need balls and cones with players standing 10-15 yards apart in a circle. We used 5 players in the session.

HOW TO DO IT

When they are volleying the ball to each other – let them catch the volley and return it by dropping it onto their foot rather like a goalkeeper would.

Tell your players to use the top of their foot to pass the ball over the distance to ensure it drops exactly into the hands of the other players.

Make sure there is not too much height on the volley pass.

HOW TO ADVANCE IT

Tell your players to spread around the field volleying the ball to each other to catch. Players maintain a distance of 10-15 yards between each other. In the diagram, A volleys to D who catches, then from his hands he volleys it to C and so the practice continues. You can try progressing to no hands. Players must then control the ball by foot, head, chest or thigh before volleying on to the next player or volley first time.

TECHNIQUE

Players use the top of the laces of their boots and kick through the centre of the ball for power and direction.



The Lone Ranger – wins the ball and beats the keeper

davidscwnew

Although this game is heavily weighted in favour of the passing team, the
need to make 10 consecutive passes puts pressure on the players in a
tight area.

If the defender does manage to force a mistake, he needs to show stamina
and composure to make his efforts count by scoring a goal. Collective pressure and individual responsibility are key elements of what
makes players and teams successful.

How to set it up:

  • This game uses two teams of four players.

  • One works as the passing team. The other works as defenders, though only one player works at a time.

  • Create a playing area measuring 40×25 yards.

  • At one end, place a goal and goalkeeper.

  • At the other, mark out a 10-yard square centred on the far touchline.

The rules:

  • The passing team of four players works in the 10-yard square, passing
    the ball around and attempting to retain possession.

  • One at a time, each player in the defending team must enter the area
    and attempts to win possession from the passers.

  • If the defending player manages to force a mistake or win possession,
    he leaves the ball where it is and runs towards the other goal. Receiving a pass from you, he tries to score past the keeper.

  • The defending team gains a point for each goal scored.

  • The passing team scores a point for each set of 10 consecutive passes.

  • When the passing team manages to make 10 consecutive passes, the
    defender is replaced.

  • Each defender has two attempts at winning the ball in the 10-yard
    square during each game.

  • Swap teams and repeat the game so players experience both roles.



Patterns of play

davidscwnewPatterns of play are essential to the game. They can begin with any player on the pitch, and range from extremely simple to frighteningly complex! But the more players practise them and understand their effectiveness, the better the rewards for your team.

Here’s a game I use that starts with my full back. It doesn’t involve any long balls, but does require crisp, accurate passing. See if it works for you!

What to do

  • Set up as shown in the pictures above. There is a target man (T) at each end of the area, plus two neutrals (N) and a 3v3 in the main 50×40 yards area, not including the centre circle, which has its own 2v2. Players cannot step over area boundaries.
  • There are two balls in play at all times, starting with the target players who play out to the full back.
  • Teams score a point by receiving the ball from one target man and pass it the length of the area to the other but each player on the team must touch the ball. This doesn’t include neutrals, who play for the attacking team.
  • Tackling is only allowed in the centre circle, although blocks are allowed elsewhere. If play is turned over in the centre, the ball must go back to a target player for a new move to start.
  • When a point is scored, target players restart by passing the ball to a player on the non-scoring team.
  • Increase the game’s difficulty by making the neutral players defenders. If they win possession they return the ball to a target player.

The practice

  • The game is great for practising moving patterns through midfield.
  • It encourages players in the main area to be constantly on the move to help those in the centre.
  • Players must be alert to opportunities to pass, particularly because a team could find itself in possession of two balls at once.
  • Players must learn to pick up on preferred patterns of play from players in designated positions. The game encourages players to read and learn others’ preferences.


When more turn up for training than you expect

davidscwnewI had an email this week asking about how I cope when more players turn up at training than expected. It was a timely question as I had just coached a session of 15 players when I expected only nine or 10 to turn up.

We were training indoors for a quick passing session and I had created a plan accordingly. However, with a bit of clever tweaking, I was soon able to put the session into shape to accommodate the increased numbers. The indoor arena was probably only big enough to hold 12 players comfortably but the extra players meant I could go for a session about winning the ball and keeping it in crowded areas of the pitch.

So I split the group into three teams of five players. Rather than have a normal small-sided game I decided to play all three teams at once making the central areas tight and over-crowded. I had yellows defending one goal and oranges defending the other. The other team of five were ‘mavericks’, who could score in either goal.

This gave each team plenty to think about – which team were their true ‘opponents’, for a start.

At first, the set-up caused a lot of confusion as players were trying to work out who was doing what, particularly because this was in such a congested area. My response to this was to stop play after a couple of minutes. I asked each team to take a minute to work out between themselves who should pick up which opposition players when possession was lost.

Once they had a clear idea of a game plan it made matters a lot simpler, and the overcrowded pitch became much less of a consideration.

I was pleased with how the session turned out because the players were encouraged to make a lot of decisions outside of the basic necessity of keeping the ball with numerous opponents around them.

The point here was to show them that even with a huge number of distractions, if each player focused on the key elements that affected his own game, the proposition seemed a lot less complex.

For the final five minutes I went to two teams playing with the other resting. Sure enough, the freedom in this set-up (compared to three sides playing at once) saw players using space and being aware of their marking responsibilities with real clarity, which was a great result.

All in all, a great solution to the problem of an unexpectedly high turnout!



Possession and penetration

davidscwnew

Here’s a session, divided into two parts, that benefits players in three core elements.

At the heart of this is possession, but keeping the ball is only really useful if players know what to do with it, and that’s where patience and penetration come into play.

This practice also allows players to rehearse passing, receiving, turning, screening, one-twos, running with the ball and overlaps.

How to play it

Non-directional practice

This is an ideal start for getting younger players using combinations without having to get the ball to a designated target. It really cements the basics of support play, with overloads helping to create confidence in maintaining possession (see the top picture).

  • Set this up so attackers have a strong overload (I use 11v5 in a 30×15 yards area, but you can use a smaller area with a 9v4 or a 7v3).
  • Both teams must try to win the ball and keep possession of it – they’ll do this by supporting and communicating well with team mates at all times.
  • Play for five minutes, switching players so that all get to work with and against the overload.

Directional practice

Now, the objective for both teams is to pass the ball to either of the target players, who are positioned in five-yard channels at each end of the area. Moving in to a directional practice replicates match-like demands of retaining possession and finding an end target (see the middle and bottom pictures).

  • In the example given, this is 6v6 in the middle, plus two floaters (F) who always play with the team in possession (to make 8v6).
  • If a successful pass is made to a target player, he passes the ball back to the team previously in possession and the other end is attacked.
  • If play is turned over, the other team can now use the floaters in an 8v6, and attempt to feed the ball to either target man.
  • Play for five minutes.

Technique and tactics

  • Look for the creation of space (wide and deep), as individuals and as a team.
  • Pass selection is important, with the focus on accuracy, weight and timing of the release.  


Let your players be creative: Switching play

davidscwnewThis session is a fantastic opportunity for your players to be creative in opening up different sides of the pitch – if you let them. Get them together ask them how you would use the six-goal area to create space and get them to try out their ideas. Fun? Yes. Educational? Yes. Match realistic? Yes.

Point the kids in the right direction, give them a few challenges to solve, and you’ll be amazed at what they can achieve.

Sometimes the pressure of feeling you have to tell your players everything you want them to learn can stop the learning experience happening.

If someone was standing over you telling you how to work your computer every time you turned it on, you probably wouldn’t bother thinking about what you are doing. Which means it’s going to take you a lot longer to remember to push the right keys to get to where you want. It’s the same for your players.

Switching play (moving the ball from one side of the pitch to the other) will allow teams to create significantly more space on a football pitch. And that, in turn, can lead to better goalscoring situations.

Changing this angle of an attack requires intelligence and reasonable passing ability, but get it right and it’s a potent weapon for your team.

Here’s how to do it.

How to set it up:

  • Set up a 45×20 yards playing area.
  • On both long sides, position three goals using poles or cones, each five yards wide. Each team protects three goals.
  • In the area, a 4v3 takes place. The overload is designed to help one team achieve the coaching focus.

Getting started:

  • Teams must maintain possession, use quick switching of play to find space – with both short and long passes – and score in any of the goals.

Progressing the session:

  • After 10 minutes, add two players in sweeper roles behind the goals their team is defending. The opposition cannot score in a goal the sweeper is protecting.
  • Rotate players regularly.

Game situation:

  • Set up a 50×40 yards area with a full-size goal at one end and three small goals at the other. Play 5v4 (including the keeper), use normal rules. The team with the overload attacks the three goals. Here, look for switches from deep and quick breaks forward.

Why this works:

The session encourages forward angled passing, one-twos and through balls, and rehearses offensive as well as defensive principles. Teams that can hold onto the ball and make use of the space will create lots of scoring chances.




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